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Bernard Tomic fined entire £45,000 match fee for 58-minute defeat

Bernard Tomic fined entire £45,000 match fee for 58-minute defeat

Australian tennis star Bernard Tomic lives up to ‘Tomic The Tank Engine’ nickname as he is fined entire £45,000 match fee for not trying after losing quickest Wimbledon’s men’s match in 15 yearsBernard Tomic was beaten in straight sets by Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on TuesdayThe Australian has been fined his entire match fee for a lack…


Australian tennis star Bernard Tomic lives up to ‘Tomic The Tank Engine’ nickname as he is fined entire £45,000 match fee for not trying after losing quickest Wimbledon’s men’s match in 15 years

  • Bernard Tomic was beaten in straight sets by Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on Tuesday
  • The Australian has been fined his entire match fee for a lack of effort
  • It is the second time in three years he has been fined at Wimbledon 
  • Tomic has been criticised for lacking effort since his days on junior circuit 
  • He also quit Australian I’m a Celebrity…in 2018 after just three days 

Bernard Tomic has been fined his full Wimbledon prize money of £45,000 for a lack of effort in his first round defeat – which lasted just 58 minutes.

Wimbledon authorities docked him the pay after ruling he did not meet the ‘required professional standard’ in his match against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.

It is the second time in three years that the controversial Australian has been fined at the All England Club after being fined £15,000 following a defeat in 2017 in which he admitted he was ‘bored’ at Wimbledon. 

The 26-year-old was beaten in the shortest men’s match at SW19 in 15 years, just four minutes shy of Roger Federer’s 54-minute demolition of Alejandro Falla in 2004.

It is the latest in a long line of incidents where the player has been accused of ‘tanking’ – deliberately not trying in a match – which earned him the nickname Tomic the Tank Engine.

And he even quite the Australian version of I’m A Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here after just three days in 2018, leading to more criticism over his attitude. 

Bernard Tomic, pictured, has been fined his full Wimbledon prize money of £45,000 over a lack of effort in his first round defeat to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

Bernard Tomic, pictured, has been fined his full Wimbledon prize money of £45,000 over a lack of effort in his first round defeat to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

Tomic lost to Tsonga, pictured, in 58 minutes, the shortest men's match at Wimbledon since a 54-minute match in 2004

Tomic lost to Tsonga, pictured, in 58 minutes, the shortest men’s match at Wimbledon since a 54-minute match in 2004

Tomic has repeatedly faced accusations of not trying hard enough over his career

Tomic has repeatedly faced accusations of not trying hard enough over his career

In 2017 he was fined £15,000 for a straight sets defeat by Mischa Zverev, after which he admitted he faked an injury and was ‘bored’ by Wimbledon, admitting he had put in ’50 per cent effort’.

How Tomic broke the rules 

Tomic was fined under Article three of the Wimbledon Code of Conduct that governs on-site behaviour of all players

The Article includes a section devoted to first round performances to ensure players do not enter merely to secure the £45,000 prize money awarded to each loser.

The rule states: All players are expected to perform to a professional standard in every Grand Slam match.

With respect to First Round Performance, if in the opinion of the Referee the player did not perform to the required professional standard, the Referee may determine that the player be subject to a fine of up to first round prize money (£45,000).

Factors that may be considered by the Referee in making such a determination include, but are not limited to, the following:

(i) the player did not complete the match;

(ii) the player did not compete in the 2-3 week period preceding each Grand Slam;

(iii) the player retired from the last tournament he/she played before the Grand Slam Main Draw;

(iv) the player was using a Protected or Special Ranking for entry;

(v) the player received a Code Violation for failure to use Best Efforts.

Wimbledon confirmed the match referee found Tomic did not perform to the required standard although he can appeal the decision.

After Tuesday’s lacklustre showing, Tomic was quizzed repeatedly about his effort levels and repeatedly said: ‘Next question, please.’ 

Tomic later defended his performance this week and insisted he played poorly instead of without effort.

He said: ‘I think I played as best as I could. It’s just I played terrible.

‘I played well last week. This week, tough first round. I knew if I didn’t feel good, I’d lose this match quickly. 

‘We played so fast. It’s not like we’re going to have a lot of rallies out there.’ 

Tomic was once seen as a rising star of tennis but has been criticised for his attitude in recent years. 

In 2011, aged 18, he became the youngest man to reach a Wimbledon quarter-final since 1986. 

Three years earlier, aged 15, he became the youngest junior Wimbledon men’s singles winner since 1950. 

Fans have nicknamed him ‘Tomic the Tank Engine’ amid claims he has deliberately given up in matches he was losing and ‘turned up for the prize money’. 

He ran into trouble over his effort even at a junior level, and was once reported to Tennis Australia by coaches at the Junior French Open in 2007 for ‘lack of effort’ in a second round defeat. 

In 2009 he sparked a row with fellow countryman and former Wimbledon winner Lleyton Hewitt when, aged 16, he refused to practice with the then 28-year-old, with his team claiming ‘Lleyton wasn’t good enough to hit with’. 

Tomic later claimed he had swine flu and ‘did not want to expose Lleyton to it’.  

Tomic, pictured with fellow Australian and World Number One women's player Ash Barty, right, in 2010 when both were juniors, even earned the nickname Tomic the Tank Engine over accusations of deliberately 'tanking' in matches

Tomic, pictured with fellow Australian and World Number One women’s player Ash Barty, right, in 2010 when both were juniors, even earned the nickname Tomic the Tank Engine over accusations of deliberately ‘tanking’ in matches

Fans quickly turned on Tomic and accused him of 'tanking' or deliberately giving up

Fans quickly turned on Tomic and accused him of ‘tanking’ or deliberately giving up

In 2012 he received three traffic fines in one day for driving a BMW in Australia, despite not having a full licence, including refusing to stop for police. He then lost his licence a year later over a separate speeding incident.  

Tomic’s rap sheet 

Bernard Tomic has been involved in several controversies over the past 10 years in tennis:

2007:Was accused of a ‘lack of effort’ in second round defeat in Junior French Open

2009:Had row with Lleyton Hewitt after allegedly refusing to practice with him because he ‘wasn’t good enough’ 

2012:Accused of ‘tanking’ against Andy Roddick at US Open

Also dropped from Australian Davis Cup team over ‘poor attitude’

Meanwhile he was fined three times in one day for traffic offences including failing to stop for police

2013:Loses driving licence after being caught speeding

His father John is later convicted of assault for headbutting his training partner Thomas Drouet although he avoids jail

2014:Booed off at Australian Open after pulling out one set into match with Rafael Nadal due to ‘groin injury’

2015:Blames Tennis Australia for career problems citing a ‘lack of support and respect’

Tomic is arrested in Miami over noise complaints at party at his hotel penthouse. He later apologised 

2017:Quits match in Acapulco over ‘unbearable’ 80F heat

Tomic is then fined £15,000 at Wimbledon for ‘lack of effort’ in straight sets defeat by Mischa Zverev. He also admits faking an injury and said he was ‘bored’

2018:Quits Australian version of I’m a Celebrity…after just three days after failing a ‘tucker trial’ 

He was again accused of ‘tanking’ against Andy Roddick at the 2012 US Open and told a reporter from Reuters he would ‘remember him’ when questioned about his effort in a post-match press conference. 

Even Tennis Australia, his home organisation, have levelled the accusation against him, dropping him from their Davis Cup tie in 2012 citing his ‘poor attitude’

A statement released at the time said: ‘As a team, we just felt that part of the commitment that we make to athletes and athletes make to the sport is they always put 100 per cent commitment and effort in competing for their country.’

Two years later he was booed off the court at the Australian Open after pulling out of a match with Rafael Nadal after just one set, complaining of a groin injury, prompting Australian tennis legend Pat Rafter to say Tomic could be one of the greats if he ‘pulled his head in’. 

The war of words did not stop there, and after a defeat to Novak Djokovic at Wimbledon in 2015, Tomic branded Rafter a ‘good actor’ and blamed Tennis Australia for his ‘up and down’ career because of a ‘lack of support and respect’. 

He has also previously pulled out of a match because of ‘unbearable heat’, quitting his clash with Donald Young in Acapulco over the 80F temperature in 2017.

In January 2018 he was again branded a quitter after leaving the Australian version of I’m a Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here just three days into the competition, becoming the first star to bail out of the show in four years.

He left following a ‘tucker trial’ in which he had to complete an obstacle course while suspended in mid-air wearing goggles that made everything appear upside down.

After giving up due to nausea, he then went to the diary room to tell producers he wanted to leave.

He said: ‘I just wasn’t expecting all this. This is not the real world, this is the jungle. This is so different. This is not what I expected. I don’t think I can do it. I think it’s best if I go.’ 

Others asked if they could play Wimbledon and earn £45,000 if Tomic was allowed to

Others asked if they could play Wimbledon and earn £45,000 if Tomic was allowed to

Some branded him 'disrespectful' and urged Wimbledon bosses to make an example of him

Some branded him ‘disrespectful’ and urged Wimbledon bosses to make an example of him

Meanwhile in 2013 his father John was caught up in a row with Tomic’s then training partner Thomas Drouet, headbutting the Frenchman and breaking his nose at the Madrid Masters tournament. 

The incident happened in the middle of the street with Tomic Senior claiming it was self defence.

He was handed an eight-month jail sentence but did not serve time due to a loophole in Spain that means first time offenders do not go to prison if their sentence is less than two years.     

Tomic himself was arrested in 2015 at a party at his hotel penthouse in Miami, following late-night noise complaints from his neighbours. The tennis player later apologised for the disturbance. 

Bernard Tomic fined entire Wimbledon £45,000 match fee for 58-minute defeat

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