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Streamer Bugha defends the post-nerf controller input for Fortnite. Published 23 hours agoon June 26, 2020 There’s been a holy war, of sorts, during the past few seasons of Fortnite. Keyboard and mouse (KBM) players constantly called out their controller counterparts for “legal aimbot,” especially when using a controller on PC.Since then, Epic have taken…

Streamer

Bugha defends the post-nerf controller input for Fortnite.

Published

23 hours ago

on

June 26, 2020

There’s been a holy war, of sorts, during the past few seasons of Fortnite. Keyboard and mouse (KBM) players constantly called out their controller counterparts for “legal aimbot,” especially when using a controller on PC.

Since then, Epic have taken several steps to remedy the situation. They nerfed aim assist on all platforms, then nerfed it twice on PC-only. The most recent nerf was a substantial one, and controller players felt it, immediately. The automatic tracking took a massive hit, which was what most KBM players complained about.

A lot of the noise has quieted since this recent nerf. KBM players seem satisfied and most of the controller players are still using their preferred input. There are still some benefits to using a controller, but they have been lowered, significantly.

During a recent stream, Bugha – one of the primary aim assist complainers – was asked about controllers by one of the members of his chat. “Bro, no one gives a f*** about controller, man,” Bugha exclaimed. “Stop bringing that up, it’s so annoying. Like, no one cares, man, I’m sorry.”

“I care,” Bugha’s teammate, Avery, told him. “They have f***ing aimbot.” The two then began to debate the topic, with Bugha standing up for the post-nerf controller input.

(1:38 for mobile viewers)

Bugha continued to passionately defend controller players, saying that “they’re not good anymore.” When Avery brought up spraying with an SMG, Bugha told him, “That’s all that they can do.”

It’s clear that Bugha, one of the most popular pro Fortnite players, is trying to distance himself from those who still complain about controller players. He, at the very least, thinks that the most recent nerf was enough. With stances like this one, we may have finally seen the final nerf to aim assist on PC.

Patch Notes

Epic are responding to one of the biggest problem in competitive Fortnite: helicopters.

Published

1 day ago

on

June 26, 2020

Epic seem to be taking the competitive Fortnite scene a lot more seriously in Fortnite Chapter 2. Chapter 1 was plagued with meddlesome items and vehicles like the Junk Rift, BRUTE, Baller, and X-4 Stormwing. In Chapter 2, they simplified the loot pool, added an “evaluation period” to new items, and made adjustments where they needed to.

Helicopters were left out of competitive modes in Fortnite Season 2. A lot of players wondered why that was – it seemed like a balanced vehicle. Well, in Chapter 2 Season 3, we saw the problem that Epic were avoiding.

Pro scrimmages and high-level Arena matches were immediately dominated by helicopters. You’d see four or more Choppas in the sky as the zones closed, all ignoring one another in pursuit of higher placements. It seemed like we were entering Baller and plane territory with the Choppa.

On June 26, Epic released a hotfix to Fortnite that reduced the spawn rate of helicopters in competitive modes. This might not eliminate the problem, but it will lower the frequency of the issue.

We’ve pushed an update to reduce Choppa spawn rates in all competitive and tournament playlists.

— Fortnite Status (@FortniteStatus) June 26, 2020

The one question that we have is: are these helicopter spawn locations static or did Epic nerf the spawn rate, only. If the latter is true, then players will have to roll the dice with their drop spot. The Authority may or may not have a helicopter, for instance.

While this hotfix might be a bandaid on a bigger issue, it shows that Epic are listening to their competitive community and taking action when they need to. It’s a far cry from Season X where they left the BRUTE in competitive modes, unchecked, for weeks.

Esports

Epic Games has contacted us with an official response to claims that they failed to pay some Fortnite pro players.

Published

2 days ago

on

June 26, 2020

Yesterday, we covered a story about pro players and content creators calling out Epic Games for failing to pay them their tournament winnings and Support-A-Creator earnings. You can take a look at the original story here.

On June 25, Epic Games reached out to us with a statement on the issue, clarifying why some of the prize money and Creator Code earnings have been held up. Below is the official statement from Epic Games on the matter.

Via: Epic Games

Epic Games’ official response to FortniteINTEL

“Recently, we experienced delays to Competitive prizes due to two separate issues. The first issue was related to our DreamHack Anaheim event. Here, we encountered delays due to additional California state tax withholding that required manual processing of payments outside of our Hyperwallet payment system. All prizes for DreamHack Anaheim have been sent directly to player bank accounts. These prizes should be deposited in the respective winners accounts in the next few days. We apologize for the delay.

The second issue was related to overpayments for some prize winners of online cups due to a clerical error and required manual correction. Now that we have sorted out the overpayment issues, we are back on track to process prizes in a more timely manner.

Regarding Support-A-Creator payouts, there are two issues at play. The first relates to us running into obstacles as we transition to a new payment system, including bugs and delays. We appreciate Creators who have been patient as we make this transition and resolve those issues. Creators who are encountering issues should watch our Hyperwallet Account Activation tutorial or reach out to Support-A-Creator Player Support for assistance.

The second issue involves creators who have violated the terms of the Support-A-Creator program by scamming or defrauding players. Typically these individuals create social media material that falsely promises special benefits to players relating to a specific Support-A-Creator code. The players use the code but never receive the special benefits they were promised. When these accounts are detected or reported, we remove these creators from the program and do not pay out their fraudulent accounts. We take these violations seriously, and are looking at additional measures to prevent bad actors from abusing the program, up to and including potential legal action.”

There should be a more detailed blog post from Epic Games on the topic within the hour, giving more information on all of these issues. We’ll keep you updated as this story develops.

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