May warns ‘Brexit won’t happen without compromise on both sides’

May warns ‘Brexit won’t happen without compromise on both sides’

Theresa May warns ‘Brexit won’t happen without compromise on both sides’ as she addresses the nation in a cosy video chat as she faces a backlash over talks with LabourIn a video message recorded sitting on a sofa, Theresa May said delivering Brexit would mean ‘compromise on both sides’Facing criticism for reaching out to Corbyn,…

 

Theresa May warns ‘Brexit won’t happen without compromise on both sides’ as she addresses the nation in a cosy video chat as she faces a backlash over talks with Labour

  • In a video message recorded sitting on a sofa, Theresa May said delivering Brexit would mean ‘compromise on both sides’
  • Facing criticism for reaching out to Corbyn, she said: ‘I think often that members of the public want to see their politicians working together more often.’
  • The Prime Minister adopted an uncharacteristically casual tone in the video, using contractions and colloquialisms

The Prime Minister has announced her intention to find a compromise in cross-party talks on Brexit, in a video message delivered in the manner of a fireside chat.

Sitting back with one arm resting on the arm of a sofa, and speaking directly to camera, Theresa May used a colloquial tone to tell voters she disagreed with Labour but claimed on Brexit the two sides agreed on ‘ending free movement, ensuring we leave with a good deal, protecting jobs, protecting security.’

Her comments came Jacob Rees-Mogg called Mr Corbyn’s inclusion in talks ‘a mistake’ this morning and Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom said the Tories were working with him ‘through gritted teeth’.

With a note of laughter injected into her delivery, Mrs May said: ‘It’ll mean compromise on both sides, but I believe that delivering Brexit is the most important thing for us.’

Despite having been heavily criticised for two years for refusing to include other parties in the Brexit process, Mrs May added: ‘And when you think about it, people didn’t vote on party lines, when it came to the Brexit referendum, and you know I think often that members of the public want to see their politicians working together more often.’

In the video message filmed at her Chequers country retreat, the Prime Minister said: ‘Over the last few days, people have been asking me what on earth’s been happening with Brexit.

‘And I can understand that, because after all it’s nearly three years since people voted in the referendum, for the UK to leave the European Union.

‘Well where we’re at is that the government negotiated a deal with the EU, and my preference was for that deal to be passed by Parliament and we could leave the EU on that basis.

But Parliament’s now rejected that deal three times, and right now as things stand, I can’t see them accepting it.

The Prime Minister adopted an uncharacteristically casual tone in the video, using contractions and colloquialisms as she said cross-party talks would require compromise

‘But at the same time Parliament has also said that they don’t want us to leave without a deal. – with no deal.

‘Indeed this very week Parliament’s been legislating to block no deal.

‘So the choice that lies ahead of us is either leaving the European Union with a deal, or not leaving at all.

‘Now I think, the Government thinks, we absolutely must leave the European Union., We must deliver Brexit.

‘That means we need to get a deal over the line, and that’s why we’ve been looking for new ways – a new approach – to find an agreement in Parliament, and that means cross-party talks.

‘And when you think about it, people didn’t vote on party lines, when it came to the Brexit referendum, and you know I think often that members of the public want to see their politicians working together more often.

 

Mrs May said after Parliament rejected her deal and No Deal, the choice was between a deal and staying in the EU

‘Now there’s lots of things on which I disagree with the Labour Party on policy issues, but on Brexit I think there are some things we agree on.

‘Ending free movement, ensuring we leave with a good deal, protecting jobs, protecting security,.

‘And so we’re talking.

‘Can we can we find a way through this, that ensures we can get a good deal, and a deal agreed through Parliament.

‘It’ll mean compromise on both sides, but I believe that delivering Brexit is the most important thing for us.

‘I think that people voted to leave the EU, we have a duty as a Parliament to deliver that.

‘I want to do that in a good way, that doesn’t disrupt people’s lives, that protects jobs, protects our security, protects the United Kingdom, and that’s what the Government’s Kingdom, and that’s what the Government’s working for.

 

Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom said the Prime Minister’s deal with Brussels already had a ‘customs arrangement’ aimed at tariff-free trade, and asked why Labour did not support it

Labour’s key demand is for a customs union with Brussels in order to protect the flow of goods, but Brexiteers vehemently oppose anything that would restrict the UK’s ability to strike free trade deals through being bound by tariffs set by the EU.

Labour’s Rebecca Ms Long-Bailey told BBC’s Andrew Marr Show that in the talks Labour had discussed how any changes to the Brexit agreement ‘could be entrenched’ so that any potential future Conservative leader, such as Boris Johnson, would not be able to ‘rip up’ any compromise – a so-called ‘Boris-proof’ deal.

She said a customs union was ‘defined in international law’ and ‘the proposals we have seen from the Government so far and their direction of travel over the last two years have not been compliant with the definition of a customs union’.

But Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom said the Prime Minister’s deal with Brussels already had a ‘customs arrangement’ aimed at tariff-free trade.

She added: ‘My expectation – and I’m not party to the discussions – is that the Prime Minister will only seek to agree those things that still constitute Brexit.’

The Prime Minister heads to Brussels on Wednesday for an emergency summit aimed at securing a further delay to Brexit, with Mrs May hoping for an extension until June 30 at the latest, with the option of leaving the EU earlier if a deal can get through Parliament.

If no extension is agreed then the UK is set to leave without a deal on Friday.

Tory Eurosceptics are furious at the Prime Minister’s handling of the Brexit process.

The Sunday Telegraph reported that Conservative activists are refusing to campaign for the party and donations have ‘dried up’ because of Mrs May’s leadership.

In a letter to the Prime Minister, more than 100 current and would-be Tory councillors state that they are unable to muster the volunteers needed to effectively fight next month’s local elections because ‘belief in the party they joined is gone’.

 

Theresa May warns ‘Brexit won’t happen without compromise on both sides’

 

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