Share
Queen’s doctor Peter Fisher hit and killed after lorry crash in Holborn

Queen’s doctor Peter Fisher hit and killed after lorry crash in Holborn

A doctor to the Queen has died after his bicycle was hit by a lorry in London on National Cycle to Work day. Dr Peter Fisher served as homeopathic physician to the monarch for 15 years. A spokesperson for Buckingham Palace told Metro.co.uk that the Queen has been informed of his death.

The palace will make no further comment, the spokesperson added. Dr Fisher was killed in a crash with a lorry at about 9.30am on Wednesday in High Holborn.





The 67-year-old has been remembered by the medical community as an internationally renowned physician who was well-liked among colleagues. Sir Marcus Setchell, the Queen’s former surgeon-gynaecologist, told the Evening Standard: ‘He was much respected as a good doctor who saw homeopathy as complementary to medical care. We are all shocked by his tragic loss.’ Dr Fisher was director of research at the Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine, and president of the Faculty of Homeopathy.

Queen’s doctor
Dr Peter Fisher was an internationally renowned homeopathy expert (Picture: Getty)
He is the eighth cyclist to have been killed on the streets of the capital this year (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

Greg White, chief executive of the Faculty of Homeopathy, told the Standard: ‘It’s no exaggeration to say Peter is an irreplaceable talent. ‘He truly was a giant in all his fields of endeavour, which included clinician, researcher and academic.’





The homeopathy expert was also described as a ‘loving person’ with a ‘very clever sense of humour’ by Dr Gualberto Diaz-Saez, scientific adviser for the Spanish Society of Homeopathic Medicine, who knew him for 15 years. Dr Fisher is the eighth cyclist to have been killed in the capital this year. Witnesses attempted to give him CPR, but he died at the scene. Scotland Yard said the driver stopped at the scene and has not been arrested.

Anyone who witnessed the fatal collision should contact police on 0208 991 9555, quoting CAD 1899 of August 15.