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Tennessee Primaries: What to Watch For

Tennessee Primaries: What to Watch For

Tennessee primary voters on Thursday will choose which candidates to send to the general election. Democrats hope that the governorship and a Senate seat may be up for grabs, and the state, which President Trump won by 26 points in 2016, also has three open House seats.Polls close at 8 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time and…


Tennessee primary voters on Thursday will choose which candidates to send to the general election. Democrats hope that the governorship and a Senate seat maybe up for grabs, and the state, which President Trump won by 26 points in 2016, also has three open House seats.

Polls close at 8 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time and 7 p.m. Central Daylight Time. We will have results shortly after.

Tennessee could move closer to electing its first female governor

$45.7 million had been spent in the race.

Last week, Vice President Mike Pence endorsed Ms. Black, who could become the state’s first female governor if she wins in November.

The two-way race on the Democratic side between former Mayor Karl Dean of Nashville and State House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh has been placid in comparison; Mr. Dean is favored to win.

The Tennessean, a local newspaper, estimated that Mr. Dean had raised 15 times as much as Mr. Fitzhugh, and spent four times as much.

endorsed her on Twitter and at a rally in Tennessee. Mr. Pettigrew is a long-shot candidate.

On the Democratic side, Phil Bredesen, a popular former governor, is seen as the front-runner inthe contest that includes John Wolfe,a lawyer from Chattanooga, and the perennial candidate Gary Davis.

Three House districts have open seats currently held by Republicans

For the House, keep an eye on the Second, Sixth and Seventh Districts, all of which have open seats that are currently held by Republicans.

In the Second District, the leading Republican contenders are Mayor Tim Burchett of Knox County, State Representative Jimmy Matlock, Air Force Lt. Col. Ashley Nickloes and Jason Emert, a businessman.

There are three Democratic candidates: Renee Hoyos, the executive director of the Tennessee Clean Water Network; Joshua Williams, a businessman and hospital administrator; andJoseph Schenkenfelder.

In the largely rural Sixth District, the three leading Republican candidates are Bob Corlew, a retired chancery court judge; Judd Matheny, a member of the Tennessee House of Representatives; and John Rose, a farmer and small business owner.

withdrew as Mr. Trump’s nominee to be secretary of the Army last year amid criticism of his opposition to federal efforts to bar discrimination against gay and transgender people.

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