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Trump threatens to double down on his trade war with China — and the fight could be about to get ugly

Trump threatens to double down on his trade war with China — and the fight could be about to get ugly

Trump threatens to double down on his trade war with China — and the fight could be about to get ugly Bob Bryan Aug. 1, 2018, 9:54 PM 0 facebook linkedin twitter email print iStock; David Becker/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider President Donald Trump requested the US Trade Representative explore the option to hit $200…


Trump threatens to double down on his trade war with China — and the fight could be about to get ugly

trump china tariffs 2x1iStock; David Becker/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

  • President Donald Trump requested the US Trade Representative explore the option to hit $200 billion worth of Chinese imports to the US with a 25% tariff on Wednesday.
  • Trump originally proposed only a 10% tariff on the goods.
  • The move would be a major escalation of the next planned round of tariffs.
  • The tariffs could go into effect within the next few months.

President Donald Trump could be about to double down on the next phase of the trade war with China

Senior administration officials told reporters on Wednesday that Trump asked the US Trade Representative to explore the possibility of imposing a 25% tariff on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports to the US. The original proposal was to hit the same amount of goods with a 10% tariff.

The tariffs could not go into effect until September, said the officials, and no final decision had been made on whether impose the tariffs. The public has until September 5 to comment on the proposal.

The tariff increase would represent another major escalation of the trade war between the US and China, which has seen roughly $74 billion worth of trade between the two countries get hit with tariffs.

The proposed increase drew criticism from industry groups like the National Retail Federation (NRF), which said that the move would ultimately hurt US consumers.

Increasing the size of the tariffs is merely increasing the harm that will be done. And it’s even more than that – it’s two-and-a-half times the amount originally proposed,” Matthew Shay, NRF CEO, said in a statement. “Tariffs are an unacceptable gamble with the U.S. economy and the stakes continue to rise with no end in sight.”

This next wave of tariffs was originally announced in July, after China hit the US with countermeasures in response to Trump’s initial wave of tariffs. If tariffs on another $200 billion worth of goods proceeds, about half of all Chinese goods coming into the US would be subject to trade restrictions.

The Trump administration released a preliminary list of goods that could be subject to this wave of tariffs. The products range from agricultural products like pork and apples to consumer goods like wool hats and vacuum cleaners.

The Chinese government has warned that the country will retaliate with trade restrictions of equal measure if Trump follows through on the threat.

Read more: Trump’s trade war is getting serious — here’s why it started, what it means for the US economy, and how it could hit you

The fight over trade kicked off in March when Trump threatened to hit $50 billion worth of Chinese imports with a 25% tariff. Attempts at avoiding the tariffs fell apart in May and the countries officially imposed tariffs in early July.

Trump’s trade fights, including the battle with China, are starting to seep into the US economy based on recent data. Concerns about the trade war are popping up in various business and consumer confidence surveys, prices for goods hit by various tariffs are on the rise, and businesses are starting to feel the squeeze from the increased prices.

Here’s a timeline of the US-China trade war so far:

  • March 1: Trump announces tariffs on all imports of steel and aluminum, including metals from China.
  • March 22: Trump announces the US will soon hit $50 billion worth of Chinese goods with a 25% tariff. China announces tariffs in retaliation for the steel and aluminum tariffs and promises a response to new announcement.
  • April 3: The US Trade Representative announces the full list of Chinese goods that could be subject to the tariff. There is a mandatory 60-day comment period for industries to ask for exemptions from the tariffs.
  • April 4: China rolls out a list of more than 100 US goods with roughly $50 billion that will be subject to retaliatory tariffs.
  • May 19: After a visit from Chinese officials, the two countries announce the outline of a deal to avoid the tariffs.
  • May 29: The White House announces that the tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese goods will move forward, with the final list of goods released June 15. The move appears to wreck the nascent trade deal.
  • June 15: Trump rolls out the final list of goods subject to new tariffs . Chinese imports worth $34 billion will be subject to the new 25% tariff as of July 6, with another $16 billion worth of imports subject to the tariff at a later date. China retaliates with an equivalent set of tariffs.
  • June 18:Trump threatens a 10% tariff on another $200 billion worth of Chinese goods.
  • July 6: The first tranche of tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods goes into effect, China responds in kind.
  • July 10:The US releases the initial list of $200 billion worth of Chinese goods that could be subject to a 10% tariff. 

More: Donald Trump Trump Tariff Tariff China Tariff

US-China Trade War US-China trade Trade War

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